How to Keep Calm and Carry on- Inside Your House

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Keep Calm and Carry on

2020. It’s time to stay home. For some families, it’s normal, they are used to being together a lot, while for others this may be slightly more difficult because they feel trapped amidst the outbreak of this novel Coronavirus.

There are a lot of articles now about what to do and how to cope with the situation. We’ve compiled a list of suggestions, and it’s divided into three sections

  1. Watching
  2. Listening
  3. Doing (solo, in couples, with children)

Let’s start with the most obvious one.

1.Watching

What is your favorite ever tv series? Mine is Med Men. It’s got, like, million one-hour long episodes, but it’s sooo exciting. Would I watch it all over again? Absolutely! Because other than it’s captivating, it reminds me of good times. An immediate dopamine injection. Or I’ll rewatch Big Bang Theory- it’s hilarious and we need a good laugh these days.

So, make a list of all the shows you wanted to binge but didn’t have energy or space to start. Now’s the time. Fix yourself some popcorn, switch off the lights and enjoy your faux movies.

You can watch other things as well. Documentaries, for instance. Or fantastically animated psychology videos on all things life from The School of Life. You won’t regret a minute, I promise.

Or this truly inspiring video of Oprah with Michelle Obama.

Also, think of your hobbies and google them. Say, design. “Best website designs ever”. Or travel. “The most beautiful secluded beaches”. Or weddings. “Houston wedding venue on a rustic ranch” And so on. You’ll have hours of fun and will think about the present uncertainties less.

Watch YouTube tutorials! So many life hacks we need to learn.

2. Listening

One word: music. This one is obvious, but some people forget about the healing power of music. If you’re an anxious type and it makes you fidgety, try listening to alpha waves, they have a tremendously calming effect on the human mind. Some people listen to alpha waves at work if the environment is too stressful or they need to concentrate better. But, you’ll think about your office later.

Podcasts! Tons of them. Whatever is your field of interest, I’m sure you’ll find a good pool of interesting podcasts on the topic.

Here are some suggestions:

Joshua Becker from https://www.becomingminimalist.com talks about minimalism and decluttering your life.

Parents will have a lot of insight while listening to Peace and Parenting.

All people will benefit from reading the best-selling author James Clear and his amazing tips on habits, forming and breaking them. Here he offers his favorite podcasts They also offer a super useful newsletter, sign up and check for yourselves, they are ad-free and truly inspiring.

Then there is Irene Lyon, a nervous system expert, and somatic trauma practitioner if you feel there’s some trauma trapped amidst this #covid19 pandemic.

And you can always download some meditation apps, like Head Space. Brilliant!

Exchange your playlist with your friends. Maybe you’ll find some new interesting tunes.

Lastly, listen to the sounds of nature on a fantastic website such as A Soft Murmur for free! You’ll thank us later.

3. Doing

Gosh, this is vast.

Are you a fan of lists? First, make a list and see what suits your current feelings. It will differ depending on whether you’re solo or partnered.

The situation shifts considerably if you are a parent as well. Add a freelance work, and that’s a recipe for potential fallout. You’ll need to be as organized as Rebels preparing to invade the Death Star (any Star War fans here?).

Write emails to your people. Write an email to yourself, too. How you envisage the future, your plans as detailed as possible. Include your dream vacations. Rethink your vision for the future. Describe how you’d like your relationships to develop. Consider ending some, if they feel toxic and overwhelming.

Nourish the other though. Invite your inner circle over to some video dinners or FaceTime coffee. It’s not ridiculous if seeing them otherwise isn’t possible. The same applies for playdates.

Create some sort of a logbook with a Google Doc, ask people to add their favorite links. For super-organized, add categories, such as book recommendations, films, shows, cartoons, educational channels, geek stuff.

Think of all the stuff you kept postponing: now compile another list and start seeing to them. Declutter a drawer, then your handbag- there is maybe a dinosaur hiding in. Make a pile for books, magazines, and clothes to donate once this crisis is over. Re-organize your computer, transfer your phone photos. Think of all the check-ups you need to do later in the year (like a dentist, notary, etc) and put it on your agenda.

Learn some new skills. Photoshop maybe? Or project management. There are a lot of free courses online. You’ll find a good list here.

Journal what you’ve been going through. It’s a great way to truly spend some time with yourself mindfully and discern what’s going on internally. So, inner work. Even if you think you know what’s going on, you can’t really see your potentially toxic patterns if you don’t pause to consider them. For example, you can use the Illuminate series from the 6seconds.org to learn how to make a game plan for slump times like these.

If you’re home with your family, try board games, playing cards or charades. They’re always fun. Or karaoke. You can’t fail with singing. Because…there’s no audience to judge your pitch.

For parents, there are tons of material online. Amazing mazes, coloring pages (of your child’s favorite characters) and educational videos and games. Go check this list of other fun activities for people having a lot of time with their kids.

And read! Picture books with your offspring, or that book you bought three months ago. We may not change the situation, but we may change what we do while we’re in it.

Conclusion

Quarantining and having fun, you say? Yes, since we have technology that previous generations would have dreamed about in isolation.

It’s true that all of a sudden we’ve got quite a lot of time on our hands, but still we don’t have to waste it.

Use it mindfully.

And stay safe.

AuthorBio: James Barnes is an experienced wedding organizer and blogger at theannexevents.com. He specialized in organizing outdoor wedding events.When he isn’t writing about weddings and marital life, David usually goes swimming or playing squash.

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